What do I think of you — what do you think of me? Who are you? Who am I? — that quivers again its uneasy air over us, and the pulse quickens and the eye brightens and all the insanity of personal existence without which life would fall flat and die, begins again. Virginia Woolf, from The Waves

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For the philosopher is right who says that nothing thicker than a knife’s blade separates happiness from melancholy… — Virginia Woolf, Orlando

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hoodoothatvoodoo:

It’s all you can do..

hoodoothatvoodoo:

It’s all you can do..

We do not know our own souls, let alone the souls of others. Virginia Woolf, On Being Ill
The idea has come to me that what I want now to do is to saturate every atom. I mean to eliminate all waste, deadness, superfluity: to give the moment whole; whatever it includes… Waste, deadness, come from the inclusion of things that do not belong to the moment; this appalling narrative business of the realist: getting on from lunch to dinner: it is false, unreal, merely conventional. Why admit anything to literature that is not poetry — by which I mean saturated?

Virginia Woolf in her diary, 28 November, 1928

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He thought her beautiful, believed her impeccably wise; dreamed of her, wrote poems to her, which, ignoring the subject, she corrected in red ink.

Mrs. Dalloway by Virginia Woolf (published May 14, 1925)

Today’s a good day to correct with red ink or buy flowers yourself… or re-visit an old classic like Mrs. Dalloway. Have a perfectly Dalloway day!

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I want to resemble a sort of liquid light which stretches beyond visibility or invisibility. Tonight I wish to have the valor and daring to belong to the moon.

Virginia Woolf, A Writer’s Diary

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For the philosopher is right who says that nothing thicker than a knife’s blade separates happiness from melancholy… — Virginia Woolf, Orlando (via liquidnight)
I desired always to stretch the night and fill it fuller and fuller with dreams. — Virginia Woolf, The Waves (via violentwavesofemotion)

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entregulistanybostan:

Julia Prinsep Jackson (1846-1895) was the third daughter of Dr. John and Maria Pattle Jackson. Born in India in 1846, she moved to England with her mother in 1848. This photograph of Virginia Woolf’s mother was taken when she was ten years old and reveals her legendary beauty. She later became a model for Pre-Raphaelite painters, such as Edward Burne-Jones.
Reproduction of plate 31a from Leslie Stephen’s Photograph AlbumOriginal: albumen print (11.3 x 9.4 cm.)Mortimer Rare Book Room, Smith College
Smith College Libraries

entregulistanybostan:

Julia Prinsep Jackson (1846-1895) was the third daughter of Dr. John and Maria Pattle Jackson. Born in India in 1846, she moved to England with her mother in 1848. This photograph of Virginia Woolf’s mother was taken when she was ten years old and reveals her legendary beauty. She later became a model for Pre-Raphaelite painters, such as Edward Burne-Jones.

Reproduction of plate 31a from Leslie Stephen’s Photograph Album
Original: albumen print (11.3 x 9.4 cm.)
Mortimer Rare Book Room, Smith College

Smith College Libraries