tuesday-johnson:

ca. 1880’s, [portrait of Dr. Isreal P. Lecrone, M.D. in a rubberized suit with skull]
via Alex Peck’s Medical Archives

tuesday-johnson:

ca. 1880’s, [portrait of Dr. Isreal P. Lecrone, M.D. in a rubberized suit with skull]

via Alex Peck’s Medical Archives

scanzen:

Measuring the physiological response to heat stress in a climatic chamber. Two women technicians monitor equipment to which a man, in a controlled environment to the left, is connected via numerous electrodes attached to his body. WHO photo by Novosti.
via Images from the History of Medicine

scanzen:

Measuring the physiological response to heat stress in a climatic chamber. Two women technicians monitor equipment to which a man, in a controlled environment to the left, is connected via numerous electrodes attached to his body. WHO photo by Novosti.

via Images from the History of Medicine

scanzen:

Masks worn during experiments with Plague. Philippines, probably around 1912.
via Otis Historical Archives/National Museum of Health and Medicine

scanzen:

Masks worn during experiments with Plague. Philippines, probably around 1912.

via Otis Historical Archives/National Museum of Health and Medicine

scanzen:

Pre-PET Headgear (Positron Emission Tomography)
In 1961, chemists at brookhavenlab studied how to detect small brain tumors by analyzing the decay of radioactive material injected into the patient’s bloodstream and preferentially absorbed by the tumor. To help them, BNL’s Instrumentation Division built different arrays of detectors, and this circular type proved best. In the 1970’s, BNL helped reconstruct the raw data received by the detectors into an image of the working brain. This breakthrough led to more practical devices for imaging areas of the brain: today’s PET machines. Today, Brookhaven is a leader in addiction research. BNL scientists use PET technology to study major areas of medical research including, drug and alcohol addiction; the development of a new strategy for addiction treatment; obesity and eating disorders; attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD); aging and neurodegenerative disorders.
via Brookhaven National Laboratory

good morning…

scanzen:

Pre-PET Headgear (Positron Emission Tomography)

In 1961, chemists at brookhavenlab studied how to detect small brain tumors by analyzing the decay of radioactive material injected into the patient’s bloodstream and preferentially absorbed by the tumor. To help them, BNL’s Instrumentation Division built different arrays of detectors, and this circular type proved best. In the 1970’s, BNL helped reconstruct the raw data received by the detectors into an image of the working brain. This breakthrough led to more practical devices for imaging areas of the brain: today’s PET machines. Today, Brookhaven is a leader in addiction research. BNL scientists use PET technology to study major areas of medical research including, drug and alcohol addiction; the development of a new strategy for addiction treatment; obesity and eating disorders; attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD); aging and neurodegenerative disorders.

via Brookhaven National Laboratory

good morning…

scanzen:

Randolph Field, TX. Cpl. Charles F. Morris of Bristow, OK, an assistant instructor of aviation medical examiners at the US Air Force School of Aviation Medicine, is just all eyes these days. These two giant specimens are used in classes to teach the fundamental actions of the muscles used by the eyes and they even light up in real life fashion. Moved by two small motors, the large-sized eyes also enable large groups to see its actions in classroom discussions, and are another of the instruments developed by aero medical researchers in the continuing program of aviation medicine.
via Otis Historical Archives – National Museum of Health and Medicine

scanzen:

Randolph Field, TX. Cpl. Charles F. Morris of Bristow, OK, an assistant instructor of aviation medical examiners at the US Air Force School of Aviation Medicine, is just all eyes these days. These two giant specimens are used in classes to teach the fundamental actions of the muscles used by the eyes and they even light up in real life fashion. Moved by two small motors, the large-sized eyes also enable large groups to see its actions in classroom discussions, and are another of the instruments developed by aero medical researchers in the continuing program of aviation medicine.

via Otis Historical Archives – National Museum of Health and Medicine

scanzen:

Nurses working at sterilizing equipment.
via Otis Historical Archives – National Museum of Health and Medicine
Album Art

mudwerks:

Sons and Daughters | Medicine

ArtistSons and Daughters
TitleMedicine
AlbumThe Repulsion Box
(via Ultra-thin e-skin could lead to advances in medicine, cool wearable computing (video))

Remember the names Martin Kaltenbrunner and Takao Someya — that way, you’ll have someone to blame when kids start pointing and laughing at gadgets we consider high-tech today. Leading a team of University of Tokyo researchers, they have recently developed a flexible, skin-like material that can detect pressure while also being virtually indestructible. Think of the possibilities: with a thickness of one nanometer, this could be used to create a second skin that can monitor your vital signs or medical implants that you can barely feel, if at all. Also, temperature sensors could be added to make life-like skin for prosthetics… or even robots! Like other similar studies, however, the researchers have a long journey ahead before we see this super-thin material in medicine…

(via Ultra-thin e-skin could lead to advances in medicine, cool wearable computing (video))

Remember the names Martin Kaltenbrunner and Takao Someya — that way, you’ll have someone to blame when kids start pointing and laughing at gadgets we consider high-tech today. Leading a team of University of Tokyo researchers, they have recently developed a flexible, skin-like material that can detect pressure while also being virtually indestructible. Think of the possibilities: with a thickness of one nanometer, this could be used to create a second skin that can monitor your vital signs or medical implants that you can barely feel, if at all. Also, temperature sensors could be added to make life-like skin for prosthetics… or even robots! Like other similar studies, however, the researchers have a long journey ahead before we see this super-thin material in medicine…

lauramcphee:

Miss Lydia Monroe, Student Nurse, Provident Hospital, Chicago, 1942 (Jack Delano)

lauramcphee:

Miss Lydia Monroe, Student Nurse, Provident Hospital, Chicago, 1942 (Jack Delano)