burnedshoes:

© Zdeněk Tmej, 1940s, Broken Glasses, Breslau, Poland
This photograph was first published in the book  ’Abeceda - Dusevniho Prazdna' (The Alphabet of Spiritual Emptiness), in which Tmej portrays the experience of captivity in a Nazi forced labor camp, from a rare captive's perspective, through images loaded with furtiveness and despair.
I updated an older post about this interesting book (or let’s better call it: ‘piece of history’) with more pictures and information (you can also find the answer to the question about the unusual hue of these photos there). You can find it here.
» find more photobooks here «  |   » more photos of World War 2 «

burnedshoes:

© Zdeněk Tmej, 1940s, Broken Glasses, Breslau, Poland

This photograph was first published in the book  ’Abeceda - Dusevniho Prazdna' (The Alphabet of Spiritual Emptiness), in which Tmej portrays the experience of captivity in a Nazi forced labor camp, from a rare captive's perspective, through images loaded with furtiveness and despair.

I updated an older post about this interesting book (or let’s better call it: ‘piece of history’) with more pictures and information (you can also find the answer to the question about the unusual hue of these photos there). You can find it here.

» find more photobooks here «  |   » more photos of World War 2 «

Beautiful 1932 Poland 10 zlotych, Queen Jadwiga

“Jadwiga (Polish pronunciation: [jadˈvʲiga]; 1373/4 – 17 July 1399) was monarch of Poland from 1384 to her death. Her official title was ‘king' rather than 'queen', reflecting that she was a sovereign in her own right and not merely a royal consort. She was a member of the Capetian House of Anjou, the daughter of King Louis I of Hungary and Elizabeth of Bosnia.[2] She is known in Polish as Jadwiga, in English and German as Hedwig, in Lithuanian as Jadvyga, in Hungarian as Hedvig and in Latin as Hedvigis…” [wikipedia]

Beautiful 1932 Poland 10 zlotych, Queen Jadwiga

Jadwiga (Polish pronunciation: [jadˈvʲiga]; 1373/4 – 17 July 1399) was monarch of Poland from 1384 to her death. Her official title was ‘king' rather than 'queen', reflecting that she was a sovereign in her own right and not merely a royal consort. She was a member of the Capetian House of Anjou, the daughter of King Louis I of Hungary and Elizabeth of Bosnia.[2] She is known in Polish as Jadwiga, in English and German as Hedwig, in Lithuanian as Jadvyga, in Hungarian as Hedvig and in Latin as Hedvigis…” [wikipedia]

zolotoivek:

Stanislaw Wyspianski - Portrait of Leontyna Sternbach, 1904 

zolotoivek:

Stanislaw Wyspianski - Portrait of Leontyna Sternbach, 1904