1953 … safe in the basement! (by x-ray delta one)

A shielded dummy in a basement for atomic bomb testing in Nevada, March 1953. – Photo by Volkmar Wentzel, National Geographic

1953 … safe in the basement! (by x-ray delta one)

A shielded dummy in a basement for atomic bomb testing in Nevada, March 1953. – Photo by Volkmar Wentzel, National Geographic

1956 Hertz Rent A Car Advertisement National Geographic October 1956 (by SenseiAlan)

1956 Hertz Rent A Car Advertisement National Geographic October 1956 (by SenseiAlan)

vintagenatgeographic:

Members of the San Diego Ballet rehearse The Waltz of the Flowers from the Nutcracker
National Geographic | July 1969

vintagenatgeographic:

Members of the San Diego Ballet rehearse The Waltz of the Flowers from the Nutcracker

National Geographic | July 1969

(via littlenikki9-deactivated2014042)

(via TYWKIWDBI (“Tai-Wiki-Widbee”): A “standing version” of a seesaw)

A school girl soars twice her height in a standing version of a seesaw in Tokyo, Japan, November 1964.  Photograph by Winfield Parks, National Geographic.

(via TYWKIWDBI (“Tai-Wiki-Widbee”): A “standing version” of a seesaw)

A school girl soars twice her height in a standing version of a seesaw in Tokyo, Japan, November 1964.  Photograph by Winfield Parks, National Geographic.

monolithzine:

A sea dragon and her child from a 1978 issue of National Geographic.

monolithzine:

A sea dragon and her child from a 1978 issue of National Geographic.

(via littlenikki9-deactivated2014042)

(via This Is What it’s like to Be in a Leopard Seal’s Mouth : The Scuttlefish)
“I slipped into the water terrified of what might happen and I swam up to this leopard seal. My legs were shaking and I had dry mouth…she took my whole head and camera inside her mouth…”

National Geographic photographer Paul Nicklen went to Antarctica to photograph a leopard seal and came across the biggest seal his guide had ever seen. After trying to engulf him, the seal began to nurture Nicklen, bringing first live, then injured, then dead penguins as he continuously rejected her offerings. This continued for four and a half days.

video at link

(via This Is What it’s like to Be in a Leopard Seal’s Mouth : The Scuttlefish)

“I slipped into the water terrified of what might happen and I swam up to this leopard seal. My legs were shaking and I had dry mouth…she took my whole head and camera inside her mouth…”

National Geographic photographer Paul Nicklen went to Antarctica to photograph a leopard seal and came across the biggest seal his guide had ever seen. After trying to engulf him, the seal began to nurture Nicklen, bringing first live, then injured, then dead penguins as he continuously rejected her offerings. This continued for four and a half days.

video at link

(via National Geographic Visits to the USSR | English Russia)

  1. A girl from Altai
  2. Engraver at work, Tobolsk
(via The Smallest Parts of Our World - National Geographic)


Perched on the tendril of aPassiflora plant, the egg of the Julia heliconian butterfly may be safe from hungry ants. The eggs are no larger than .07 inch.


Photograph By Martin Oeggerli, National Geographic

(via The Smallest Parts of Our World - National Geographic)

Perched on the tendril of aPassiflora plant, the egg of the Julia heliconian butterfly may be safe from hungry ants. The eggs are no larger than .07 inch.

Photograph By Martin Oeggerli, National Geographic