rivimadison:

Featured interview here x  Freelance modelsP : Dylan Staley x MUA : Kat St. John x Harness : Maddox Leather

rivimadison:

Featured interview here x  Freelance models
P : Dylan Staley x MUA : Kat St. John x Harness : Maddox Leather

lolitasheartshapedglasses:

Sue Lyon and director Stanley Kubrick share a laugh during the filming of ‘Lolita’ (1962)

lolitasheartshapedglasses:

Sue Lyon and director Stanley Kubrick share a laugh during the filming of ‘Lolita’ (1962)

(via hoodoothatvoodoo)

hoodoothatvoodoo:

Sue Lyon as ‘Lolita’
Photo by Bert Stern
1960

hoodoothatvoodoo:

Sue Lyon as ‘Lolita’

Photo by Bert Stern

1960

As far as I can recall, the initial shiver of inspiration was somehow prompted by a newspaper story about an ape in the Jardin des Plantes who, after months of coaxing by a scientist, produced the first drawing ever charcoaled by an animal: this sketch showed the bars of the poor creature’s cage. — Vladimir Nabokov, from “On a Book Entitled Lolita” (via liquidnight)
piratetreasure:

lolita
italian poster, 1969

piratetreasure:

lolita

italian poster, 1969

(via )

Album Art

oldhollywood:

Sue Lyon - Lolita Ya Ya (Lolita: Original Motion Picture Soundtrack)

Composed by Nelson Riddle

ArtistSue Lyon
TitleLolita Ya Ya
oldhollywood:

On the Lolita set, Stanley Kubrick cranes his neck behind Sue Lyon’s back to watch James Mason’s performance from the same angle as the camera (1961, via)
“The perfect novel from which to make a movie is, I think, not the novel of action but, on the contrary, the novel which is mainly concerned with the inner life of its characters. It will give the adaptor an absolute compass bearing, as it were, on what a character is thinking or feeling at any given moment of the story. And from this he can invent action which will be an objective correlative of the book’s psychological content, will accurately dramatise this in an implicit, off-the-nose way without resorting to having the actors deliver literal statements of meaning.
…People have asked me how it is possible to make a film out of Lolita when so much of the quality of the book depends on Nabokov’s prose style. But to take the prose style as any more than just a part of a great book is simply misunderstanding just what a great book is. Of course, the quality of the writing is one of the elements that make a novel great. But this quality is a result of the quality of the writer’s obsession with his subject, with a theme and a concept and a view of life and an understanding of character.
Style is what an artist uses to fascinate the beholder in order to convey to him his feelings and emotions and thoughts. These are what have to be dramatised, not the style. The dramatising has to find a style of its own, as it will do if it really grasps the content.”
-excerpted from Kubrick’s essay “Words and Movies” (Sight & Sound, 1960-61)

oldhollywood:

On the Lolita set, Stanley Kubrick cranes his neck behind Sue Lyon’s back to watch James Mason’s performance from the same angle as the camera (1961, via)

“The perfect novel from which to make a movie is, I think, not the novel of action but, on the contrary, the novel which is mainly concerned with the inner life of its characters. It will give the adaptor an absolute compass bearing, as it were, on what a character is thinking or feeling at any given moment of the story. And from this he can invent action which will be an objective correlative of the book’s psychological content, will accurately dramatise this in an implicit, off-the-nose way without resorting to having the actors deliver literal statements of meaning.

…People have asked me how it is possible to make a film out of Lolita when so much of the quality of the book depends on Nabokov’s prose style. But to take the prose style as any more than just a part of a great book is simply misunderstanding just what a great book is. Of course, the quality of the writing is one of the elements that make a novel great. But this quality is a result of the quality of the writer’s obsession with his subject, with a theme and a concept and a view of life and an understanding of character.

Style is what an artist uses to fascinate the beholder in order to convey to him his feelings and emotions and thoughts. These are what have to be dramatised, not the style. The dramatising has to find a style of its own, as it will do if it really grasps the content.”

-excerpted from Kubrick’s essay “Words and Movies” (Sight & Sound, 1960-61)