(via BibliOdyssey: Succulent Carrion)
Stapelia ambigua
The main taxonomic characteristic in the 1790s was the extraordinary flower parts produced by most member species. In order to attract the blow flies that pollinate the flowers, many Stapelia species (and related/synonymous Orbea varietals) give off a stench of rotting flesh. The deceit is so effective that the flies lay eggs in the flowers, not realising there is no food to sustain emerging maggots.
"The hairy, oddly textured and coloured appearance of many Stapelia flowers has been claimed to resemble that of rotting meat, and this, coupled with their odour, has earned the most commonly grown members of the Stapelia genus the common name of ‘carrion flowers’. [W] 
”[..] named by Linnaeus after the 17th-century botanist Johannes van Stapel, there are about 100 species taking their common names both from the flower shape and the smell of dead meat designed to attract flies as pollinators.” [C]

(via BibliOdyssey: Succulent Carrion)

Stapelia ambigua

The main taxonomic characteristic in the 1790s was the extraordinary flower parts produced by most member species. In order to attract the blow flies that pollinate the flowers, many Stapelia species (and related/synonymous Orbea varietals) give off a stench of rotting flesh. The deceit is so effective that the flies lay eggs in the flowers, not realising there is no food to sustain emerging maggots.

"The hairy, oddly textured and coloured appearance of many Stapelia flowers has been claimed to resemble that of rotting meat, and this, coupled with their odour, has earned the most commonly grown members of the Stapelia genus the common name of ‘carrion flowers’. [W
”[..] named by Linnaeus after the 17th-century botanist Johannes van Stapel, there are about 100 species taking their common names both from the flower shape and the smell of dead meat designed to attract flies as pollinators.” [C]
Dogsbane (by aussiegall)

Dogsbane (by aussiegall)

Spring on the way (by april-mo)

Spring on the way (by april-mo)

(via BibliOdyssey: Plant Anatomy Charts)
Cosmarium botrytis
(see: Algaebase)

(via BibliOdyssey: Plant Anatomy Charts)

Cosmarium botrytis
(see: Algaebase)
(via Tribulus terrestris - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia)

Tribulus terrestris is a flowering plant in the family Zygophyllaceae, native to warm temperate and tropical regions of the Old World in southern Europe, southern Asia, throughout Africa, and Australia.[2] It can thrive even in desert climates and poor soil. Like many weedy species, this plant has many common names, including bindii,[3] bullhead,[4] burra gokharu, caltrop,[1] cat’s head,[1][3] devil’s eyelashes,[5] devil’s thorn,[1][5] devil’s weed,[1]
goathead,[1] puncturevine,[1] and tackweed.[6]
It is a taprooted herbaceous perennial plant that grows as a summer annual in colder climates. The stems radiate from the crown to a diameter of about 10 cm to over 1 m, often branching. They are usually prostrate, forming flat patches, though they may grow more upwards in shade or among taller plants. The leaves are pinnately compound with leaflets less than 6 mm (a quarter-inch) long. The flowers are 4–10 mm wide, with five lemon-yellow petals. A week after each flower blooms, it is followed by a fruit that easily falls apart into four or five single-seeded nutlets. The nutlets or “seeds” are hard and bear two to three sharp spines, 10 mm long and 4–6 mm broad point-to-point. These nutlets strikingly resemble goats’ or bulls’ heads; the “horns” are sharp enough to puncture bicycle tires and to cause painful injury to bare feet.[7]

I hate these fucking goatheads…

(via Tribulus terrestris - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia)

Tribulus terrestris is a flowering plant in the family Zygophyllaceae, native to warm temperate and tropical regions of the Old World in southern Europe, southern Asia, throughout Africa, and Australia.[2] It can thrive even in desert climates and poor soil. Like many weedy species, this plant has many common names, including bindii,[3] bullhead,[4] burra gokharucaltrop,[1] cat’s head,[1][3] devil’s eyelashes,[5] devil’s thorn,[1][5] devil’s weed,[1]

goathead,[1] puncturevine,[1] and tackweed.[6]

It is a taprooted herbaceous perennial plant that grows as a summer annual in colder climates. The stems radiate from the crown to a diameter of about 10 cm to over 1 m, often branching. They are usually prostrate, forming flat patches, though they may grow more upwards in shade or among taller plants. The leaves are pinnately compound with leaflets less than 6 mm (a quarter-inch) long. The flowers are 4–10 mm wide, with five lemon-yellow petals. A week after each flower blooms, it is followed by a fruit that easily falls apart into four or five single-seeded nutlets. The nutlets or “seeds” are hard and bear two to three sharp spines, 10 mm long and 4–6 mm broad point-to-point. These nutlets strikingly resemble goats’ or bulls’ heads; the “horns” are sharp enough to puncture bicycle tires and to cause painful injury to bare feet.[7]

I hate these fucking goatheads…

Inside (by aussiegall)

Inside (by aussiegall)

(via The Amazing Monkey Orchid ~ Kuriositas)

…from the south-eastern Ecuadorian and Peruvian cloud forests from elevations of 1000 to 2000 meters…

(via The Amazing Monkey Orchid ~ Kuriositas)

…from the south-eastern Ecuadorian and Peruvian cloud forests from elevations of 1000 to 2000 meters…

living fossil (by lemank)

living fossil (by lemank)