Dogsbane (by aussiegall)

Dogsbane (by aussiegall)

Spring on the way (by april-mo)

Spring on the way (by april-mo)

(via BibliOdyssey: Plant Anatomy Charts)
Cosmarium botrytis
(see: Algaebase)

(via BibliOdyssey: Plant Anatomy Charts)

Cosmarium botrytis
(see: Algaebase)
(via Tribulus terrestris - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia)

Tribulus terrestris is a flowering plant in the family Zygophyllaceae, native to warm temperate and tropical regions of the Old World in southern Europe, southern Asia, throughout Africa, and Australia.[2] It can thrive even in desert climates and poor soil. Like many weedy species, this plant has many common names, including bindii,[3] bullhead,[4] burra gokharu, caltrop,[1] cat’s head,[1][3] devil’s eyelashes,[5] devil’s thorn,[1][5] devil’s weed,[1]
goathead,[1] puncturevine,[1] and tackweed.[6]
It is a taprooted herbaceous perennial plant that grows as a summer annual in colder climates. The stems radiate from the crown to a diameter of about 10 cm to over 1 m, often branching. They are usually prostrate, forming flat patches, though they may grow more upwards in shade or among taller plants. The leaves are pinnately compound with leaflets less than 6 mm (a quarter-inch) long. The flowers are 4–10 mm wide, with five lemon-yellow petals. A week after each flower blooms, it is followed by a fruit that easily falls apart into four or five single-seeded nutlets. The nutlets or “seeds” are hard and bear two to three sharp spines, 10 mm long and 4–6 mm broad point-to-point. These nutlets strikingly resemble goats’ or bulls’ heads; the “horns” are sharp enough to puncture bicycle tires and to cause painful injury to bare feet.[7]

I hate these fucking goatheads…

(via Tribulus terrestris - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia)

Tribulus terrestris is a flowering plant in the family Zygophyllaceae, native to warm temperate and tropical regions of the Old World in southern Europe, southern Asia, throughout Africa, and Australia.[2] It can thrive even in desert climates and poor soil. Like many weedy species, this plant has many common names, including bindii,[3] bullhead,[4] burra gokharucaltrop,[1] cat’s head,[1][3] devil’s eyelashes,[5] devil’s thorn,[1][5] devil’s weed,[1]

goathead,[1] puncturevine,[1] and tackweed.[6]

It is a taprooted herbaceous perennial plant that grows as a summer annual in colder climates. The stems radiate from the crown to a diameter of about 10 cm to over 1 m, often branching. They are usually prostrate, forming flat patches, though they may grow more upwards in shade or among taller plants. The leaves are pinnately compound with leaflets less than 6 mm (a quarter-inch) long. The flowers are 4–10 mm wide, with five lemon-yellow petals. A week after each flower blooms, it is followed by a fruit that easily falls apart into four or five single-seeded nutlets. The nutlets or “seeds” are hard and bear two to three sharp spines, 10 mm long and 4–6 mm broad point-to-point. These nutlets strikingly resemble goats’ or bulls’ heads; the “horns” are sharp enough to puncture bicycle tires and to cause painful injury to bare feet.[7]

I hate these fucking goatheads…

Inside (by aussiegall)

Inside (by aussiegall)

(via The Amazing Monkey Orchid ~ Kuriositas)

…from the south-eastern Ecuadorian and Peruvian cloud forests from elevations of 1000 to 2000 meters…

(via The Amazing Monkey Orchid ~ Kuriositas)

…from the south-eastern Ecuadorian and Peruvian cloud forests from elevations of 1000 to 2000 meters…

living fossil (by lemank)

living fossil (by lemank)

Green Flowers (by Giovanni88Ant)

Green Flowers (by Giovanni88Ant)